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Posts Tagged ‘business’

How GitHub Uses GitHub to Build GitHub

January 25th, 2012 No comments

I wrote a post a while back linking to an interesting video about the culture at GitHub, entitled: Optimizing for Happiness – why you want to go work at Github!.

Since then, i’ve watched a few other interesting talks about the culture and how they work at GitHub and two in particular are worth noting here.

Firstly, Zach Holman, one of the early “Githubbers” recently gave a talk about “How GitHub Uses GitHub to Build GitHub“:

Build features fast. Ship them. That’s what we try to do at GitHub. Our process is the anti-process: what’s the minimum overhead we can put up with to keep our code quality high, all while building features as quickly as possible? It’s not just features, either: faster development means happier developers. This talk will dive into how GitHub uses GitHub: we’ll look at some of our actual Pull Requests, the internal apps we build on our own API, how we plan new features, our Git branching strategies, and lots of tricks we use to get everyone – developers, designers, and everyone else involved with new code. We think it’s a great way to work, and we think it’ll work in your company, too.

You can watch the video here and also check out a series of blog posts he wrote on the same subject.

The second talk i’d recommend I had the pleasure of seeing live at a local conference i’ve attend (DIBI Conference). It’s by Corey Donohoe (@atmos):

The talk will cover the metrics driven approach GitHub uses to analyze performance and growth of our product. It will cover deployment strategies for rapid customer feedback as well as configuration management to ensure reproducibility.

You can watch the video here.

Both are great talks and well worth a watch.

Categories: Interesting Tags: ,

Optimizing for Happiness – why you want to go work at Github!

April 28th, 2011 No comments

If you are a manager or high up in any company then I highly recommend you watch this video of a recent talk by Tom Preston-Werner, co-founder of Github. It’s around an hour in length but I urge you to take the time to watch it – it’s packed full of great advice all the way through.

The way traditional businesses approach the management and organization of creative, intellectual workers is wrong. By throwing away everything that blocks productivity (meetings, deadlines, managers, titles, strict vacation policies, etc) and treating your employees as the responsible adults that they are, huge amounts of potential can be unlocked and employee happiness and retention can be at unprecedented highs. At GitHub we’ve embraced a philosophy that gets things done and strips away policy and procedure in favor of smart decision making and personal responsibility. Come see how we make it work and how you can reap the same benefits in your own company.

The video goes into both how they recruit and how they run a profitable and productive company.

At GitHub we don’t have meetings. We don’t have set work hours or even work days. We don’t keep track of vacation or sick days. We don’t have managers or an org chart. We don’t have a dress code. We don’t have expense account audits or an HR department.

We pay our employees well and give them the tools they need to do their jobs as efficiently as possible. We let them decide what they want to work on and what features are best for the customers. We pay for them to attend any conference at which they’ve gotten a speaking slot. If it’s in a foreign country, we pay for another employee to accompany them because traveling alone sucks. We show them the profit and loss statements every month. We expect them to be responsible.

We make decisions based on the merits of the arguments, not on who is making them. We strive every day to be better than we were the day before.

We hold our board meetings in bars.

We do all this because we’re optimizing for happiness, and because there’s nobody to tell us that we can’t.

You can watch the video here.

Tell me now that you don’t want to work at Github?

Categories: Interesting Tags: ,